Titles
English : studies o using spirulina for fingerlings Nile tilapia diets
Arabic : دراسات على استخدام السبيرولينا فى علائق اصبعيات البلطى النيلى
Abstract The experiments were conducted in Fish Research Center - Suez Canal University: The present study was designed to evaluate the use of spirulina (Spirulina platens is) as a replacement of protein with different levels from protein diet for fingerlings Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Spirulina was incorporated into tive isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets
At 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% of the protein - based diet. The test diets were fed to the fishat satiation twice a day for 56 days. The final weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed efficiency, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio and survival rate of fish significantly (p<0.05) higher for group of fish replaced with 20% Spirulina platensis (T5) and decreased gradually at T4 ,T3,T2 and Tl respectively. There was a significant difference in protein and lipid in carcass proximate composition of the fish fed on 20% spirulina diets as compared to those on the rest of experimental groups. These results suggest an improvement of fish health when fed with feed replacement, Moreover, fish fed with diets containing different spirulina levels exhibited higher total protein serum Creatinine, Urea, Albumin, Globulin, Triglycerides, HDL-C values. On contrary, significantly decreased Albumin Iglobulin Ratio, LDL-C, AL T and AST values compared with control as increased of Spirulina levels. The highest values were obtained at T5 diet.
This study demonstrates that up to 20% of spirulina replacement from soybean protein was most effective in stimulating fish growth and more economic for Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fingerlings under this experimental condition.
Key Words Spirulina platensis, replacement, Nile Tilapia fingerlings, growth performance, feed utilization, carcass composition.
Publication year 2016
Availability location مكتبة معهد بحوث الانتاج الحيوانى- شارع نادى الصيد- دقى- جيزة
Availability number 1384
Organization Name
Author(s) from ARC
Publication Type Master Thesis